Category Archives: Advocacy & Partnerships

CSPCP Long-Term Care Key Messages

(March 2022) CSPCP is pleased to share a Long-Term Care (LTC) Key Messages statement.The goal of this document is to clarify and define the role of palliative care in LTC, along with listing top priorities for improving access to and delivery of palliative care in LTC facilities. We thank all those who contributed their time, energy and feedback on the document, including the members of the Long-Term Care Working Group: Drs. Amit Arya (Co-chair), Anne Boyle (Co-chair), Carmen L. Johnson, Janice Legere, Giulia-Anna Perri, Hollis Roth and Ashleigh Sprange.

Please note: French translation will be available shortly.

Opioid Safety Recommendations in Adult Palliative Medicine

(Nov. 2021) The CSPCP is pleased to share a summarized versionof an article published in BMJ Supportive and Palliative Care, entitled Opioid safety recommendations in adult palliative medicine: a North American Delphi expert consensus.

The CSPCP is grateful to Dr. Jenny Lau and her research team for completion of full study and the “summarized version. The CSPCP partnered with the researchers by a) helping find participants and b) reviewing the list of 130 recommendations that emerged from the Delphi study, and selecting those that are most pertinent for specialist palliative care physicians. The recommendations span six major areas:

  • General principles
  • Measures for healthcare institution and PC training and clinical programs
  • Patient and caregiver assessments
  • Prescribing practices
  • Monitoring
  • Patients and caregiver education.

  • In addition, the CSPCP identified 8 high-priority research areas from the larger list.
    We are increasingly aware of potential non-medical use and harms related to opioids in our patient populations. The study and the summary provide excellent practice guidelines for safe opioid prescribing for our adult patients.

Palliative Care as an election issue

(September 2021) The CSPCP is a proud and active member of the Quality End of Life Care Coalition of Canada (QELCCC).

The QELCCC believes that equitable access to palliative care is a priority. We also believe that a palliative approach to care should be part of standards for Long-Term Care in Canada.

We are conducting a public campaign on Twitter and Facebook – please join in!

In addition, the QELCCC has written to party leaders asking them to commit to the three asks shown above, sent them a briefing note to deepen their knowledge, and participated in the federal pre-budget submission process. For more information and copies of all the materials, go to: https://www.chpca.ca/projects/the-quality-end-of-life-care-coalition-of-canada/

RESPONSES FROM THE PARTIES (as of Sept 16)

Conservatives

Liberals

NDP

Canadian Interdisciplinary Palliative Care Competency Framework

(August 2021) Congratulations to the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer on release of a Canadian Interdisciplinary Palliative Care Competency Framework. Included are palliative care competencies for nurses, general physicians, social workers, personal support workers who are currently in practice, and volunteers. In their release, CPAC acknowledged CSPCP as a major contributor to framework. CSPCP Board members assisted throughout the process and helped refine the physician competency section to align as closely as possible with the existing national palliative competencies used by many of Canadian medical schools: EFPPEC competencies for undergrad medical education, and PACE competencies for postgrad.

Health Canada Report on Home and Community-based Palliative Care – Lessons Learned during the COVID-19 Pandemic

(June 2021) We are pleased to share this report from the End-of-Life Care Unit at Health Canada.

English: Read more

French:  Read more

The report features many new practices and innovative tools that can improve the future of home and community-based palliative care – for example, making virtual care more accessible, increasing the availability of palliative symptom management kits, and giving family caregivers adequate support to provide palliative care for loved ones at home. It is hoped that sharing some of these new practices and tools may inspire readers to use and adapt them as required, or develop and share their own innovations. By sharing knowledge and experience, together we can come out of the pandemic stronger than before.

Thank you to Dr. Stephen Singh for participating in the discussions on behalf of the CSPCP.